Thursday, August 15, 2019

Ultraviolet Light Disinfection UV-C Check Strips


There are many industries where disinfection without the use of chemicals is critical, and ultraviolet light can provide a safe, effective solution. To ensure light exposure during a disinfection cycle, UV-C Check Strips are used. UV-C Check Strips are photochromic intensity indicators that create a simple, reliable, low cost method of monitoring ultraviolet light intensity. The Check Strips have an adhesive backing that allows for easy application to any surface.  When exposed to UV-C, the yellow labels undergo a gradual color change from yellow to green that is directly related to the energy value received.  With increased exposure, the indicator labels will deepen in color. While this color change does not guarantee sterilization, it is a way to provide validation of disinfection in a clear and easy manner.  UV-C Check Strips are important in ensuring that packaging or surfaces have indeed been exposed to germicidal ultraviolet light.


Wednesday, August 7, 2019

ClorDiSys Disinfection Services

If your facility does not necessarily require a 6-log (99.9999%) sterilization level decontamination, ClorDiSys does offer alternative disinfection options to our chlorine dioxide gas services. However, please note, the difference between spore and bacterial inactivation is the same as the difference between sterilization and disinfection. For a chemical agent to be classified as a sterilant, it must be demonstrated to be effective at inactivating spores, the hardest organisms to kill. Disinfection, on the other hand, does not require the complete inactivation of spores or all microbial life and is normally validated against a few vegetative bacteria species. For this reason, disinfecting agents are less rigorous decontaminating agents and are not as effective as sterilizing agents.

Ultraviolet Light Disinfection Services
ClorDiSys offers ultraviolet light services for contamination response or routine preventive disinfection. Ultraviolet light provides a quick, chemical free disinfection method capable of eliminating viruses, bacteria, and mold from the air and visible surfaces. UV-C is extremely inexpensive, and disinfection cycles are fast, allowing for quick turnover times of the spaces being disinfected. Utilizing products such as our Torch UV Tower, we can get a calculated 99% reduction of bacteria in 1 minute and spores in 5 minutes. Rooms, vehicles, and other enclosed spaces can be disinfected quickly and safely using this residue free process.

Chlorine Dioxide Fogging Disinfection Services
ClorDiSys also provides disinfection fogging services with liquid chlorine dioxide. The liquid chlorine dioxide is sprayed on surfaces at concentrations capable of eliminating viruses, bacteria, fungi and spores. Handheld foggers are used, so a trained technician can reach more surfaces than a stationary fogger, by opening enclosures and changing the angle of application in order to minimize shadow areas which are not being contacted.

In one case, a new facility was disinfected by fogging with a liquid chlorine dioxide to provide a clean start for research taking place within the facility.  A high concentration liquid chlorine dioxide was fogged throughout the facility, similar to a hydrogen peroxide vapor treatment.  A team opened drawers, cabinets, and equipment in order to ensure that all visible surfaces were sprayed and treated with liquid chlorine dioxide. This method offers a level of disinfection comparable to utilizing VPHP.

Wednesday, July 31, 2019

Reception at the Evan Williams Bourbon Experience

Following the IAFP exhibit hall hours on Monday, July 22nd, ClorDiSys Solutions hosted a reception at Kentucky’s first commercial distiller, Evan Williams. Located on Louisville’s historic Whiskey Row, guests entered through a safe door and took a step back in time to the Age of Prohibition where catered hors d’oeuvres and drinks were served in the venue’s “Speakeasy”.

We also had the opportunity to experience an Open House Tour of the distillery. On this self-guided tour, we passed recreations of the Louisville wharf in the late 18th Century as well as Whiskey Row from the late 1800’s through the present. Evan Williams’ Bourbon Hosts were stationed along the way to educate us and lead in four premium bourbon tastings. Additionally, we saw a state-of-the-art, modern, operating distillery utilizing the same type of pot stills as the early Bourbon-making days.

Thank you to all who were able to join us at this event, and congratulations to those who won our giveaways including an Amazon Fire HD 8 Tablet and an Echo Show. This reception is certainly going to be a tough act to follow in Cleveland for the 2020 IAFP Annual Meeting, but we are up for the challenge.

Thursday, July 25, 2019

Decontaminating Dry Processing Environments


This week, the International Association for Food Protection's (IAFP) annual meeting took place in Louisville, KY.  We had the privilege of participating in a session entitled, “Challenges of Sanitation in Dry Processing Environments: What are the Evolving Methods?” Alongside a group of our industry peers, we discussed how dry gasses can be used to complement your sanitation process. During the presentation, we described how “harborage locations” within a production environment only exist when your sanitation method is ineffective at penetrating the cracks and crevices within a facility.  Gases naturally fill up the volume they are contained within evenly, meaning that there are no surfaces which go uncontacted.  

Chlorine dioxide gas and ozone gas are two residue-free, dry gas sanitation methods that are capable of penetrating into crevices further than pathogens can hide.  This is because they have a smaller molecule size than the smallest virus, measuring in between 0.124-0.127 nm. Ozone has difficulty in large environments however, as it breaks down rather quickly with a half-life of about 30 minutes.  This makes it difficult to accumulate the proper dosage at locations further from the ozone generator as treatment times typically range from 4-36 hours.  Chlorine dioxide has a half-life much longer than the treatment time, meaning that there is no natural loss in concentration during the decontamination itself.

Gas decontamination offers a fundamentally better chance of contacting pathogens throughout a facility, which is the biggest challenge to traditional sanitation methods.  Using chlorine dioxide gas as a supplement to your traditional sanitation method in order to provide a periodic “deep clean” will help establish a true “clean break” within your facility.  Whether treating your entire production facility, a single piece of equipment, or the inside of equipment and its piping / PC lines, chlorine dioxide gas is extremely well suited to eliminate pathogens wherever they reside.

Friday, July 19, 2019

Hope for the Best, Prepare for the Worst.

Why are food facilities in need of decontamination? The most obvious is in contamination response. This could be for facilities that are shutdown and in the middle of a recall, or those simply battling some positive swab results in zones two, three or four. For situations like these, ClorDiSys offers pre-planning for an emergency decontamination. First, we would initiate communication between everyone who would potentially be involved. We would sit down with your facilities, quality and EHS people and make sure everyone knew their role if a contamination should occur. Next, we would establish potential scenarios to determine pricing. In most cases, this is better pricing, simply because other companies might see that you are vulnerable in the case of a contamination and see it as an opportunity to take advantage with the price tag. With us, you would know the cost up front and it’s likely to be less because we have planned ahead with you. Also, the preparation would not just involve you and us, but we have access to other professionals in the field who could be helpful. Finally, as long as everything can be taken care of remotely, there is no cost for us to plan this with you and the result would be a well-written procedure that you could keep in your files.

What do we need to create an emergency response plan? The only things that we would need from your company are a floor plan of the facility, the estimated cubic footage, some photos of the area, and information on the exhaust system. The reason for the exhaust system information is that we would need to know how to aerate – either directly into the air or broken down with carbon scrubbers. Preparing this plan with you could also potentially involve a site visit from us to get a better idea of the little details that would go into a successful decontamination.

If you’re ready to get started, email Kevin Lorcheim or call (908) 236-4100. You can also visit us at the IAFP Annual Meeting next week. We are booth #213.

Thursday, July 11, 2019

CD Checkstrips: Color Changing Chemical Indicators

CD Checkstrips are designed to provide an easy, quick and cost-effective way to document your chlorine dioxide decontamination process. The 1/2" x 3 3/4" strips offer a visual confirmation that chlorine dioxide gas was present in the area in which the test strip was placed. The check marks on the paper strips will change color from purple to pink when contacted by chlorine dioxide gas. The color-changed strips can be kept as part of your facility log to provide documented evidence that the decontamination process was performed. This color change does not guarantee sporicidal sterilization. For sterilization cycle verification and validation, Biological Indicators (BI’s) should be used. CD Checkstrips are non-hazardous and can be disposed of as regular waste. Click here to request a quote or call our office at (908) 236-4100.

Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Chlorine Dioxide: The Safest of all Decontaminating Agents

All decontamination methods have a safety risk due to the nature of their use. Because of that, a variety of aspects should be considered to ensure that the process will be safe for your environment and employees. Gaseous chlorine dioxide (CD) can be used safer than other fumigation methods due to its chemical properties and safety profile.

SAFETY WARNINGS (SELF-ALERTING)
The best safety feature with CD gas is that it is self-alerting. Chlorine dioxide has an odor threshold at or below the 8-hour Time Weighted Average (TWA), so the user is self-alerted to exposure at a low level and the reliance on external equipment is not as imperative. With Vapor Phase Hydrogen Peroxide (VPHP), there is no odor to provide a warning of exposure. This alone makes CD gas safer since the user and nearby personnel are self-alerted before unsafe levels are achieved, and the reliance upon external equipment is less critical.

SHORTER CYCLE TIMES
Chlorine dioxide gas has a shorter cycle time than other high level decontamination methods, lowering the risk profile for the process itself.  Decontaminating a 10” x 20” room would take approximately 3.5 hours from start to end when it is safe to reenter the room.  Formaldehyde would be about 12.5 hours, and VPHP could be 10+ hours. VPHP has longer cycles because of the extended aeration times due to the nature of vapor condensation and absorption issues that do not apply with a true gas. Formaldehyde has long cycles because of long exposure times and the neutralization time. A longer cycle time represents a greater risk as the room contains an unsafe environment throughout the decontamination process.  CD gas is able to reduce the risk by completing its decontamination cycle in a much shorter time while still delivering a complete, 6-log decontamination of the room.
 
LOWER CONCENTRATION LEVELS
Chlorine dioxide is typically used at lower concentrations for room decontamination. VPHP concentrations are typically 750-1500 ppm. Formaldehyde concentration is typically 10,000 ppm. CD concentration is typically 360 ppm. Use concentrations for all agents are much higher than safe levels, however if something goes wrong, the higher concentration of formaldehyde and VPHP poses a greater risk.

EQUIPMENT LOCATED OUTSIDE THE TARGET CHAMBER
The chlorine dioxide gas generating equipment is located outside the room or chamber being decontaminated.  If equipment is inside the room and some issue occurs, the possibility exists where the user may have to enter the during unsafe conditions in order to shut the equipment down.  Since our CD generation equipment is located outside the chamber, if an issue occurs, the equipment can easily be shutdown by hitting the stop button located on the generator or simply pulling the plug.

CARCINOGENICITY
Chlorine dioxide gas is not classified as a carcinogen by any health organization.  Chlorine dioxide is used to treat drinking water in over 800 municipalities within the United States, and it is widely used in Europe as well.  Chlorine dioxide is also on the National Organic Program’s List of Approved and Prohibited Substances as an approved substance for use in organic foods. Formaldehyde is classified as a known carcinogen by most of the leading health organizations worldwide, and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) designates VPHP as an A3, Confirmed Animal Carcinogen with Unknown Relevance to Humans.

COMPLETE DECONTAMINATION
One of the most important safety factors for decontamination methods are their ability to completely decontaminate the space they are introduced into.  Chlorine dioxide and formaldehyde are gasses which reach and penetrate all areas throughout the room/chamber including cracks, crevices and other hard to reach areas.  Vapors have difficulty reaching these areas due to poor diffusive properties and condensation issues. If the decontaminating agent cannot reach ALL of the dangerous organisms in the space, at the proper concentration, for the prescribed amount of time, then a complete decontamination will not occur and worker safety is compromised. CD gas is able to be accurately measured in real-time using a UV-vis spectrophotometer, allowing for the correct concentration and exposure levels to be met every time, making it very reliable.

For more safety facts and method comparisons, visit our website.

Friday, June 21, 2019

Case Study: Mold Remediation of a Research Facility

In the Spring of 2012, a hospital’s life science research facility experienced flooding when a pipe located two floors above burst. In addition to water damage throughout the space, mold spores, including Aspergillus niger, were introduced and distributed. Prior to repairs being made, a full facility decontamination took place to eliminate any mold or mold spores. Chlorine dioxide gas (CD) was chosen as the method of decontamination. Sixteen biological indicators (BI) consisting of Geobacillus stearothermophilus were placed throughout the 145,000 ft3 facility which contained animal holding rooms, procedure rooms, a laboratory, a cage wash area, storage rooms, necropsy rooms, locker rooms, and bathrooms.

During the decontamination, which took place over the course of 2 days, the surrounding areas of the facility were occupied. Chemical monitoring took place throughout the event to ensure that facility personnel were not exposed to any leakage. Upon completion of the decontamination, the 16 biological indicators exposed, as well as a positive control BI, were tested for growth. After the incubation period, only the positive control exhibited growth, demonstrating that the decontamination was a success and the facility was free of mold and mold spores. Success was also satisfied as there was no physical residue, and no visible indication of material degradation on any of the surfaces within the building, including the ventilated racks, plastic caging, and biological safety cabinets. There was also no visible indication of effect to any electronics or measurement devices in the area.

To read more about this specific decontamination, click here. If you are curious how ClorDiSys Solutions can help with your facility's contamination control, call us at (908) 236-4100.
 

Friday, June 7, 2019

Mold Remediation in the Cannabis Industry

During the marijuana growing process, mold can occur at any point. Mold is a major threat to cannabis, and an outbreak can be detrimental to an entire crop and, in turn, profits. Mold prevention and remediation are practices that are essential to a successful grower. Before plants enter the growing room, it is key that measures are taken to ensure no mold spores are present. This can be done to 100% effectiveness through chlorine dioxide gas decontamination. An entire facility can be sealed and decontaminated using gaseous CD to completely sterilize the space, eliminating any pre-existing organisms and their spores. A quick, chemical-free, highly effective room disinfection alternative can be implemented through ultraviolet light. Unlike a gas that can result in complete distribution of the decontaminating agent, UV-C will only kill where light is emitted onto. However, for an affordable and simple method, UV-C is the optimal solution.

The Torch™ is an easily transportable, powerful disinfection system that can be positioned in the room to achieve a 99% kill level on any surface, including plants, the light is emitted onto in mere minutes. Seeds and buds can be placed in an ultraviolet light chamber, such as the Flashbox™ or Flashbox-mini™, to achieve kill on potential spores without causing death to the seed. Seeds can also be placed inside of a Tyvek™ pouch and decontaminated inside a chlorine dioxide gas isolator.

Mold spores are also highly present in the air. To destroy this risk, ultraviolet light air circulation technology can be implemented to eliminate spores. Designed to replace a standard ceiling tile, the Torch Aire-Recessed™ installs easily to help reduce airborne pathogens. Air is drawn into the fixture through the louvered filter panels and disinfected within the center chamber. This design prevents UV-C exposure to those in the room by restricting light from passing into the occupied room, making it safe for people to be in the room at all times.

View all of our contamination control products to see what might fit your facility's needs best. 

Wednesday, May 29, 2019

Case Study: Successful Decontamination of an Aseptic Fill Isolator Using Chlorine Dioxide Gas

Isolators are gas-tight enclosures typically used in either animal isolation or pharmaceutical production applications. The isolator acts as a small clean room to protect what is contained within it from any type of contaminant that exists in the normal environment. In any scenario of isolator use, the cleaning of the inside is periodically needed and can often present a challenge to the user and facility. In many applications, the isolator will be sprayed with a variety of cleaning compounds and then wiped down. While the spray and wipe is better than not cleaning at all, it will rarely result in creating a sterile environment within the isolator. The best method for creating a sterile isolator before or after use is by exposing it to a true gas, such as a chlorine dioxide (CD).

One pharmaceutical company tested a chlorine dioxide gas generator for its sporicidal activity on a prototype La Calhene aseptic fill isolator equipped with two half-suits. Twenty biological indicators were used as the microbial challenge for each test.  They were placed throughout the isolator on representative surfaces such as the exhaust vent, HEPA fan grill, and accumulator.  The biological indicators were either used in their original glassine envelopes or removed from the glassine envelope and transferred into Tyvek/film pouches. The variables of humidification time, CD concentration and CD exposure time were manipulated. Charging time to an exposure concentration of 5mg/L took approximately 9 minutes. Aeration time to safe exposure levels of 0.1ppm took less than an hour. Several exposure cycles were shown to be successful using biological indicator spore strips each having a population of 106 spores. Additionally, chlorine dioxide gas penetrated into dead-leg areas and hard to reach areas of the isolator, such as deep vents, half-suit armpits and beneath other structures. Chlorine dioxide has proven itself to be a practical and effective method for disinfecting isolators as demonstrated by the high-level spore reduction.

To read this company’s isolator decontamination study in full, click here. For more about this specific application, click here.

Thursday, May 23, 2019

The Influx of Influenza

It is widely known that the flu is a threat to everyone’s health.  The CDC estimates that the flu has resulted in between 9.3 million and 49 million illnesses each year in the United States since 20101.  We often times hear that the flu vaccine is the best approach to avoid contracting the illness, however it is not always effective.  There are two main explanations as to why the vaccine may not prevent contracting the flu.  One is the overall attributes of the person being vaccinated, such as their age and health.  The other is the correlation between the flu viruses currently in the environment and the flu vaccine currently designed to protect our population. 

Another way to eliminate the harmful influenza virus is by eliminating it from the environment through ultraviolet light (UV-C) disinfection.  With the proper dosage, UV-C kills any organism that the light shines upon.  There are even UV-C devices designed to disinfect airborne contaminants such as the influenza virus.  The Torch Aire- Recessed™ replaces a 2’x4’ ceiling tile and has the ability to disinfect up to 12,600 cubic feet per hour.  Air is pulled into the unit and passed over enclosed UV-C lamps to kill any harmful organism in seconds.  The air is then sent through a filter, trapping any large particulates before they have the chance to reenter the space.  It is perfect for any healthcare setting thanks to its ability to continuously run while the room is occupied, as well as its ease of placement and its rapid and effective performance.

Learn more about this unit, and other UV-C disinfection devices that can fit any application you may have, by contacting us here or by visiting us at APIC June 12-14 in Philadelphia at booth 1239!   



1. www.cdc.gov

Friday, May 17, 2019

The Myths and Misconceptions of Chlorine Dioxide Gas


Chlorine dioxide gas has been recognized as a disinfectant since the early 1900's, and it has been approved by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for many applications in a variety of industries. It has been demonstrated effective as a broad spectrum, anti-inflammatory, bactericidal, fungicidal, and virucidal agent, as well as a deodorizer. Even though chlorine dioxide has been around for over a century, there is still a surprising amount of inaccurate information and misconceptions. We would like to take the opportunity to address some of those misrepresentations.

CHEMICAL PROPERTIES
Although chlorine dioxide has "chlorine" in its name, its chemistry is radically different from that of chlorine. When reacting with other substances, it is weaker and more selective, allowing it to be a more efficient and effective sterilizer. For example, it does not react with ammonia or most organic compounds. Most importantly, chlorine dioxide oxidizes products rather than chlorinating them, eliminating the formation of trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs) and other environmentally undesirable chlorinated organic compounds.

SAFETY
The very reason decontaminating agents are used is for the purpose of killing organisms. As such, no agent can truly claim to be safe. However, chlorine dioxide gas is the safest fumigant available, due to its physical attributes and process advantages. Chlorine dioxide is not classified as a carcinogen by any health agency. Chlorine dioxide does have an odor similar to chlorine, which is beneficial because chlorine is such a recognizable smell. The odor detection level is very similar to the OSHA 8-hr safety level of .1 ppm allowing you to detect any gas leakage quickly. Cycle times are shorter with CD gas due to its faster aeration time to safe levels. This means that a potentially unsafe condition exists for a far shorter time when using CD for room decontamination.

WATER SOLUBILITY
Unlike many decontaminating agents, chlorine dioxide has the unique ability to retain its sterilization capacity in water. Chlorine reacts with water to form hydrochloric acid, but chlorine dioxide does not, maintaining a neutral pH in water. Gaseous CD is the only decontaminating fumigant that penetrates water, decontaminating both the water and the surface beneath.

MATERIAL COMPATIBILITY
The leading liquid chlorine dioxide solutions are produced through the mixing of an acid and a base. It is this acid which makes the liquid chlorine dioxide solution highly corrosive. ClorDiSys, however, does not produce chlorine dioxide gas in this same way. The method of generation ClorDiSys uses is a completely dry process where a 2% chlorine, 98% nitrogen gas flows through a matrix of sodium chlorite to produce producing 100% pure chlorine dioxide gas. The chlorine dioxide gas generated through the ClorDiSys process has an oxidation potential that is 1.5 times less that of vapor-phase hydrogen peroxide (VPHP), making it technically less corrosive. Because ours is a pure and dry process, our chlorine dioxide gas doesn’t leave a residue and does not require additional cleanup.

MORE COMMONLY USED THAN YOU THINK
Chlorine dioxide is widely used as an antimicrobial and as an oxidizing agent in drinking water, poultry process water, swimming pools, and mouthwash preparations. It is used to sanitize fruit and vegetables and also equipment for food and beverage processing. It is also employed in life science research laboratories, pharmaceutical facilities, and the healthcare industry to decontaminate rooms, passthroughs, isolators, and ductwork as well as product and component sterilization. It is also extensively used to bleach, deodorize, and detoxify a wide variety of materials, including cellulose, paper-pulp, flour, leather, fats and oils, and textiles. Approximately 4 to 5 million pounds are used daily.

Friday, May 10, 2019

Contract Sterilization


ClorDiSys Solutions offers Contract Sterilization Services where we can decontaminate your items, equipment, supplies, and products at our facility and then ship them back to you or onward to a third party. ClorDiSys utilizes chlorine dioxide gas, a US EPA registered sterilant capable of killing all viruses, bacteria, fungi, and spores. Chlorine dioxide gas is also effective against beta lactams such as Penicillins, Cephalosporins, and Carbapenums as well as amplicons and pinworm eggs. Customers can choose to single or double wrap items in Tyvek and may include biological indicators as well. Turnaround time is traditionally 24 hours, with items typically being shipped back the day after they arrive. In some cases, turnaround time can be hours, with the items arriving, being treated, and shipped on the same day. Upon completion, you will be issued a Contract Decontamination Certification Sheet describing the process and showing the sterilization cycle data.



APPLICATIONS 
  • Sterilization for Non-Sterile Facilities
    • Medical Devices, Instruments, HEPA and other Sterilizing Filters
  • Equipment, Components, and Items entering a Clean Facility
    • Tools, Computers, Printers, Keyboards, RFID Tags, Monitoring Instruments, Microscopes, Animal Cages, Shoes, and Safety Glasses
  • Decontamination of Contaminated Components
    • Returns from user sites, mold issues, pinworm eggs, amplicons, and beta lactams

View our sample submittal form and call the office at (908) 236-4100 with any questions.

Wednesday, May 1, 2019

Chlorine Dioxide: What Does it Kill?

ClorDiSys' chlorine dioxide (CD) gas is registered with the United States Environmental Protection Agency as a sterilizer (EPA Reg#: 80802-1). The US EPA defines a sterilizer as able "to destroy or eliminate all forms of microbial life including fungi, viruses, and all forms of bacteria and their spores," meaning ClorDiSys' chlorine dioxide gas will inactivate any form of antimicrobial life including spores. Spores are among the hardest organisms to kill and for this reason sterilizing agents are considered the most rigorous decontaminating agents. The difference between spore and bacterial inactivation is the same as the difference between sterilization and disinfection. CD gas is also proven effective against beta-lactams, pinworm eggs, and amplicons. Testing has been done using chlorine dioxide on a multitude of specific organism types. A table with some of the more commonly seen organisms that chlorine dioxide has been proven to eliminate can be viewed here. As testing is constantly ongoing, this is not to be thought of as a complete list of organisms in which chlorine dioxide gas is effective against. To date, no organism tested against CD gas has proved resistant.

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Chlorine Dioxide & Food Contact Surfaces

As a residue free process, chlorine dioxide gas is safe for use on food contact surfaces. It is even on the National Organic Program's List of Approved and Prohibited Substances as an approved substance for use on organic foods. ClorDiSys has also been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) for antimicrobial fruit and vegetable rinses in both the gaseous and liquid states with more approvals in the works now.

Chlorine dioxide’s use is allowed under FDA jurisdiction as given in the following regulations: 
  • 21 CFR PART 173 -- SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION
  • 21 CFR PART 178 -- INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADJUVANTS, PRODUCTION AIDS, AND SANITIZERS
  • 21 CFR PART 137 -- CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS 
  • GRAS Notice 062, GRAS Notice 161

The above incorporate a variety of industry applications including chlorine dioxide’s use as an antimicrobial agent in water used in both poultry processing and for washing fruits and vegetables. It is also allowed as a sanitizing solution on food-processing equipment and utensils, to bleach whole wheat flour, and can be used in packaging materials for fresh fruits, vegetables, meats, poultry and seafood. 

Food Contact Notices (FCN) are required for any new food contact substance and uses which do not fall under the scope of the regulations above. A FCN is effective for the manufacturer, the Food Contact Substance (FCS), and the conditions of use identified in the notification and not effective for a similar or identical substance produced or prepared by another manufacturer. ClorDiSys has the following food contact notices in place: 
  • FCN 1665 – Chlorine dioxide as an antimicrobial agent used to fumigate fruits and vegetables, including raw agricultural commodities. 
  • FCN 1634 – Chlorine dioxide as an antimicrobial agent in water used in poultry processing and to wash fruits and vegetables, including raw agricultural commodities (RAC). 
  • FCN 1421 – Chlorine dioxide as an antimicrobial agent in air to treat fruits and vegetables. 
  • FCN 1400 – Chlorine dioxide as an antimicrobial agent in water used in poultry processing and to wash fruits and vegetables that are not raw agricultural commodities.

Click here to view the Food Contact Notices in their entirety, and be sure to stop by Booth #1635 at next week’s Petfood Forum and Booth #433 at next month’s Food Safety Summit.

Ultraviolet Light Disinfection UV-C Check Strips

There are many industries where disinfection without the use of chemicals is critical, and ultraviolet light can provide a safe, effectiv...